How To Boost Testosterone With Food For Bigger Muscle!

This Few Methods That Can Help You Boost Your Testosterone With Your Daily Does Of Food!

The World is Robbing You of Testosterone It’s Your Call To Make It All Work For You By Searching For It With This Food Methods That They’re Rich With Testosterone It’s Simple And It’s Easy Check Out This Methods Below !!

“Here’s what you need to know”

Low-calorie diets, like those athletes use to make weight, can lower testosterone levels.
Environmental pollutants, like direct or indirect cigarette smoke, can also play havoc with your testosterone.
Studies have shown that minor nutritional interventions can boost testosterone levels in as little as 4 weeks.
Make sure your diet is rich in garlic, magnesium, Vitamin K2, and zinc by supplementing or eating things like organ meats, shellfish, and leafy vegetables.

4 Best Dietary Testosterone-Boosters

1- Garlic (Diallyl Sulfide) 

Chopped-Garlic-Close-Up

Suggested Intake: 900 mg daily, preferably split into multiple dosages throughout the day.

2. Magnesium

cibi ricchi di magnesio

Suggested Intake:  The RDA is about 420 mg. a day for an adult male, so to enhance testosterone production, experiment with 750 mg. a day for a few weeks and see how you feel.

3. Vitamin K

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Suggested Intake: You’d have to use 12 mg per pound of body weight, which is a huge amount. Still, there’s good reason to believe that much smaller doses, on the order of something like 30 to 50 mg per day (which is still a lot), might also raise testosterone levels.

4. Zinc

Zinc

 

Suggested Intake: 40 mg daily

 

 

Your daily Dose of Motivation And Exercise for a Longer Life

Your Daily Does Of Motivation And Muscles Tips follow This Steps for Longer Life ..

Exercise has had a Goldilocks problem, with experts debating just how much exercise is too little, too much or just the right amount to improve health and longevity. Two new, impressively large-scale studies provide some clarity, suggesting that the ideal dose of exercise for a long life is a bit more than many of us currently believe we should get, but less than many of us might expect. The studies also found that prolonged or intense exercise is unlikely to be harmful and could add years to people’s lives.

No one doubts, of course, that any amount of exercise is better than none. Like medicine, exercise is known to reduce risks for many diseases and premature death.

But unlike medicine, exercise does not come with dosing instructions. The current broad guidelines from governmental and health organizations call for 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week to build and maintain health and fitness.

But whether that amount of exercise represents the least amount that someone should do — the minimum recommended dose — or the ideal amount has not been certain.

Scientists also have not known whether there is a safe upper limit on exercise, beyond which its effects become potentially dangerous; and whether some intensities of exercise are more effective than others at prolonging lives.

So the new studies, both of which were published last week in JAMA Internal Medicine, helpfully tackle those questions.

In the broader of the two studies, researchers with the National Cancer Institute, Harvard University and other institutions gathered and pooled data about people’s exercise habits from six large, ongoing health surveys, winding up with information about more than 661,000 adults, most of them middle-aged.

Using this data, the researchers stratified the adults by their weekly exercise time, from those who did not exercise at all to those who worked out for 10 times the current recommendations or more (meaning that they exercised moderately for 25 hours per week or more).

Then they compared 14 years’ worth of death records for the group.

They found that, unsurprisingly, the people who did not exercise at all were at the highest risk of early death.

But those who exercised a little, not meeting the recommendations but doing something, lowered their risk of premature death by 20 percent.

Those who met the guidelines precisely, completing 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise, enjoyed greater longevity benefits and 31 percent less risk of dying during the 14-year period compared with those who never exercised.

The sweet spot for exercise benefits, however, came among those who tripled the recommended level of exercise, working out moderately, mostly by walking, for 450 minutes per week, or a little more than an hour per day. Those people were 39 percent less likely to die prematurely than people who never exercised.

At that point, the benefits plateaued, the researchers found, but they never significantly declined. Those few individuals engaging in 10 times or more the recommended exercise dose gained about the same reduction in mortality risk as people who simply met the guidelines. They did not gain significantly more health bang for all of those additional hours spent sweating. But they also did not increase their risk of dying young.

The other new study of exercise and mortality reached a somewhat similar conclusion about intensity. While a few recent studies have intimated that frequent, strenuous exercise might contribute to early mortality, the new study found the reverse.

For this study, Australian researchers closely examined health survey data for more than 200,000 Australian adults, determining how much time each person spent exercising and how much of that exercise qualified as vigorous, such as running instead of walking, or playing competitive singles tennis versus a sociable doubles game.

Then, as with the other study, they checked death statistics. And as in the other study, they found that meeting the exercise guidelines substantially reduced the risk of early death, even if someone’s exercise was moderate, such as walking.

But if someone engaged in even occasional vigorous exercise, he or she gained a small but not unimportant additional reduction in mortality. Those who spent up to 30 percent of their weekly exercise time in vigorous activities were 9 percent less likely to die prematurely than people who exercised for the same amount of time but always moderately, while those who spent more than 30 percent of their exercise time in strenuous activities gained an extra 13 percent reduction in early mortality, compared with people who never broke much of a sweat. The researchers did not note any increase in mortality, even among those few people completing the largest amounts of intense exercise.

Of course, these studies relied on people’s shaky recall of exercise habits and were not randomized experiments, so can’t prove that any exercise dose caused changes in mortality risk, only that exercise and death risks were associated.

Still, the associations were strong and consistent and the takeaway message seems straightforward, according to the researchers.

Anyone who is physically capable of activity should try to “reach at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week and have around 20 to 30 minutes of that be vigorous activity,” says Klaus Gebel, a senior research fellow at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, who led the second study. And a larger dose, for those who are so inclined, does not seem to be unsafe, he said.

 

Facts! Where Does Your Fat Go When You Lose Weight?

Where Does Your Fat Go When You Lose Weight?

Now A Lot Of People Doesn’t Know About This Simple Fact! This Researches From Few University Has Proven That Fat Does Not Transfer To Energy or Heat,

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We talk a lot about dieting and burning off fat, but we actually have a lot of misconceptions about weight loss. Some people think fat is converted into energy or heat—a violation of the law of conservation of mass—while others think that the fat is somehow excreted or even converted to muscle. I was told early on that you can never lose your fat cells (adipose) once you gain them…they just shrink if you work it off.

Well, according to Andrew Brown from the University of New South Wales and Australian TV personality (slash former physicist) Ruben Meerman, when you lose weight, you exhale your fat. Their new calculations, based on existing knowledge about biochemistry, were published in the British Medical Journal this week.

“There is surprising ignorance and confusion about the metabolic process of weight loss,” Brown says in a news release. “The correct answer is that most of the mass is breathed out as carbon dioxide,” Meerman adds. “It goes into thin air.”

Excess carbs and proteins are converted into chemical compounds called triglycerides (which consist of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen) and then stored in the lipid droplets of fat cells. To lose weight, you’re attempting to metabolize those triglycerides, and that means unlocking the carbon that’s stored in your fat cells.

Losing 10 kilograms of human fat requires the inhalation of 29 kilograms of oxygen, producing 28 kilograms of carbon dioxide and 11 kilograms of water. That’s the metabolic fate of fat.

Then the duo calculated the proportion of the mass stored in those 10 kilograms of fat that exits as carbon dioxide and as water when we lose weight. By tracing the pathway of those atoms out of the body, they found that 8.4 of those kilograms are exhaled as carbon dioxide. Turns out, our lungs are the primary excretory organ for weight loss. The remaining 1.6 kilograms becomes water, which is excreted in urine, feces, sweat, breath, tears, and other bodily fluids.

Check Out This Benefits That You Should Exercise In Winter

Great Tips And Benefits That You Should Exercise This Winter

7 Great Benefits That You’ll Get By Training This Winter

Read Through You’ll Love The Inspiration Of Exercising This Winter

Let’s face it — it’s tough to find the motivation to exercise outside these days. During the work week, sometimes both legs of our daily commutes are completed in utter darkness. And while weekend sunshine is appreciated, it doesn’t do much to warm up our wintry surroundings. But before you throw in the towel and restrict yourself to the crowded, stuffy gym for the next few months, it may be worth giving the idea of a winter workout a second thought.

Exercisers are often concerned about the internal safety hazards that come along with chilly sweat sessions, but there is surprisingly little to worry about. Simply suiting up appropriately with enough layers made of moisture-wicking fabrics keeps the body at a healthy temperature and functioning the same way it would in any other workout environment. Sure, a slippery moment on an icy running path could lead to injury, but circumstantial (and potentially clumsy) moments aside, exercising outside during the wintertime actually boasts benefits that may not be achieved as efficiently elsewhere.

If you can pull yourself away from that cozy seat in front of the fireplace, you’ll reap these seven bonus benefits of sweating it out in the cold weather — and you might even learn to love it.

1- You’ll burn more calories.

Running in the winter.
Running in the winter.

As the body works harder to regulate its core temperature among the elements, you’ll burn a few more calories during your wintry workout compared to one conducted indoors. While the calorie burn varies with each person’s body mass and the extremity of the temperature, it can be a nice morale booster (especially around the food-focused holidays) to get more out of your sweat session in this regard.

2-You’ll strengthen your heart.

Hand of a woman lifting red heart,against blue sky
Hand of a woman lifting red heart,against blue sky

Cold weather also makes the heart work harder to distribute blood throughout the body. For an unhealthy heart that struggles to manage the additional stress, this process can exacerbate illness and injury. But a regular exerciser with cardiovascular endurance can make their heart muscle even stronger with these cold-weather sessions, better preparing the body for more strenuous workouts in the future — not to mention other non-exercise stresses in life.

 

“Find Out The Other 5 Benefits At huffington post” Click Here 

 

Incredible Smoothie for Breakfast To Lose Weight

Drink These Incredible Smoothies for Breakfast and Lose Weight Like Crazy

 

 

 

Excess body fat causes heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, fatty liver, and a higher risk of developing cancer. Foods rich in fiber keep you full for longer, and they also help you deal with food cravings. They are the ideal choice for people struggling with constipation.

Protein-packed foods are great if you want to lose weight and maintain your muscle mass at the same time. They boost energy and provide enough energy for your daily activities.

 

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If excess weight is your problem, starving yourself is the last thing you should do. Instead of your regular breakfast, make these super-delicious smoothies, and lose weight naturally.

Each of these smoothies are fantastic for breakfast and even as a great snack.  Specific ingredients will boost your metabolism and improve your body’s ability to burn fat.

Follow these great recipes to assist you in your weight loss efforts:

1. Ingredients:

  • 1 banana
  • 1 orange
  • 2 tbsp almonds, crushed
  • 2 tbsp flax seeds, grounded
  • 2 fresh or dried figs
  • 1/3 cup water

Preparation:

Juice the orange and blend it together with the rest of the ingredients until smooth and creamy. Always drink it fresh.

Note: If you are using dried figs, soak them in water for half an hour before using them.

2. Ingredients:

  • 1 cup raspberries
  • 1 apple
  • 1 banana
  • 1/2 lemon
  • 1 tbsp flax seeds, grounded

Preparation:

Blend all the ingredients until smooth. Drink it fresh.

Note: If you are using organic apples, do not peel them.

3. Ingredients:

  • 2 kiwi fruits
  • 1 banana
  • 1/2 apple
  • 1 orange
  • 1 tbsp flax seeds, grounded
  • 1 tbsp hazelnuts, grounded

Preparation:

Blend everything together until smooth. Drink your smoothie fresh.

BUILD BIGGER LEGS

BURN FAT AND BUILD BIGGER LEGS

 

By now you know it’s possible to get in a great high-intensity lower body workout at home with minimal equipment, which explains why you’re standing at the bottom of a flight of stairs with a 25- or 45-pound plate in your hands.

When you’re looking for a quick fat-burning, leg-strengthening session, you can’t go wrong with the combination of weights and stairs. And now, we’re about to show you exactly what to do with both.

In our daily lives, we typically view stairs as an inconvenience. Walking up a flight of them is something we simply put our heads down and do, because unless there’s an elevator handy, we don’t have much choice in the matter. Stairs are everywhere, but there’s a catch, and it’s a beneficial one for you: when used correctly, stairs are one of the most effective workout tools in existence. Best of all, you don’t have to join a gym to find a set.

The workout below is designed for use by the home trainee who wants a grueling, circuit-style session that won’t take long to complete. The idea here is to perform as many rounds of both exercises as possible – set seven rounds as an initial long-term goal – with minimal rest, breaking your previous record each week. Each exercise can be made either easier or harder by increasing or decreasing the number of steps in play.

To perform thrusters, hold a 25- or 45-pound plate at chest level and sit back, leading with your butt and keeping your knees behind your toes, onto the second or third stair. Once you’ve landed, stand up quickly and, in one motion using momentum generated by your lower body, press the plate overhead. For step-ups, hold the plate in a comfortable position and simply step to the second or third stair, step back down again, then repeat with your opposite leg.

 

Exercise                               Sets     Reps               Rest

Weight Plate Thruster            1          10                   60 seconds

Weight Plate Step-Up            1          10 (per leg)   60 seconds

 

BY ROB FITZGERALD

5 Workout To Burn More Calories

Find Out This Few Tips From Local Trainers And Health Athletes they’d recommend to burn those calories.

We asked local trainers and athletes what exercise they’d recommend to burn those calories. While there were various answers, running was the most popular. Try combining some exercises from this list to ensure a calorie-busting workout. And honestly, who wants to do one exercise for an entire workout, anyway?

 

1. Kettlebell Swings

“Kettlebell swings work the entire body. It’s an aerobic activity that engages all of the large muscle groups, which means you are not only burning calories during the workout, but there is a considerable exercise after-burn, as well. That means your body will continue to burn calories post-workout. While burning calories and eating less is the obvious key to weight loss, any exercise that burns calories and builds muscle simultaneously will help the body burn more at rest, too.”
—Heather Cohen, Vida Fitness

2. Walking Stairs

“Taking duration and intensity into account, I think it is safe to say that walking as quickly up stairs, for as long as possible, is the most calorie-burning exercise out there. It is something everyone can do, for a fairly long time, and something that raises heart rate and blood pressure, as well as recruiting large muscle groups in the body.”
—Monica Pampell, The Sports Club/LA

 

3. Boxing

“There is a reason you don’t see a lot of boxers with bad physiques. This combination of anaerobic and aerobic cardio, muscular endurance, and power plus speed and agility through the use of the entire muscular system can’t be beat.”
—Lance Breger, Mint DC

4. Dancing

“Go dancing. I’m not talking about the slow, shy kind. I’m talking about the ‘getting your whole body into it’ kind of dancing. The kind that you would dance if nobody was watching. When I see people in my YALA dance fusion class move, I know they are burning huge amounts of calories, but they are also having fun. And I’m positive (although I haven’t done any scientific experiments) that when you are enjoying, something, you tend to push yourself just a little bit more making you burn more calories than an exercise you would do just to do it.”
—Laurent Amzallag, YALA Fitness

 

5. Running

“Running is the most efficient workout. For 40 to 60 minutes of activity, I think it burns about the most calories of any exercise and it is very convenient and has a minimal barrier to entry (now, not even shoes are needed) that some of the other really high-calorie-burning activities like cross country skiing or rowing do.”
—Michael Wardian, professional marathon runner